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Rheumatoid Arthritis

Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease that usually affects the smaller joints in the hands and feet. In rheumatoid arthritis, the lining of the joints swell and is painful. It can eventually result in erosion of the bone and deformity in the joints.

Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disorder, which means that the patient’s immune system mistakenly attacks the body's own tissues. Rheumatoid arthritis occurs when your immune system attacks the synovium the lining of the membranes that surround your joints. The resulting inflammation thickens the synovium, which can eventually invade and destroy the cartilage and bone within the joint. The tendons and ligaments that hold the joint together weaken and stretch. Gradually, the joint loses its shape and alignment.

This disease is two to three times more prevalent in women than in men. It usually occurs somewhere between the ages of 40 and 60.

Signs and symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis may include:

. Tender, warm, swollen joints

. Morning stiffness that may last for hours

. Firm bumps of tissue under the skin on your arms (rheumatoid nodules)

. Fatigue, fever and weight loss

Early rheumatoid arthritis tends to affect your smaller joints first particularly the joints that attach your fingers to your hands and your toes to your feet. As the disease progresses, symptoms often spread to the knees, ankles, elbows, hips and shoulders. In most cases, symptoms occur in the same joints on both sides of your body.

Rheumatoid arthritis signs and symptoms may vary in severity and may even come and go. Periods of increased disease activity, called flares, alternate with periods of relative remission — when the swelling and pain fade or disappear. Over time, rheumatoid arthritis can cause joints to deform and shift out of place.

One possible therapy for rheumatoid arthritis may involve the use of powerful drugs to destroy the abnormal immune cells, followed by the replacement of abnormal blood cells with precursors of normal ones through stem-cell transplantation.

Disadvantages of Powerful Drugs

Powerful drug for patients with rheumatoid arthritis; unfortunately, it also has many side effects. Powerful drug is very expensive and moderately time consuming for the patient and medical staff. Since the effects from each drug are short-lived, it must be taken frequently.

Non-surgical & Non-drug Therapy Option

Umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (UCMSC) are proving to have significant effects on a variety of autoimmune type of problems such as rheumatoid, osteoarthritis, Lupus, colitis, mixed connective tissue disease, scleroderma, etc. Good improvement in osteoarthritis has also been seen with the intravenous administration of primitive hematopoietic stem cells (CD34+CD133+).

In general, the best results are thought to occur with the direct administration of the cells directly into the joint(s) or immediately around the joint. Osteoarthritic joints where there is no longer cartilage have also shown improvement with administration of cord stem cells directly into the joint. We have had a great deal of success with using IV injections rather than directly in the joints.

There are a number of advantages to using human umbilical cord stem cells that do not require immune suppression and which can help balance immune function by changing the genetics of the immune reactive cells. Patients who received cord stem cells reported that their arthritis pain subsided.

For more information on stem cell treatment for Rheumatoid Arthritis, please complete a medical form

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